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Navajo Birth Cohort Study

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XXIII: Chris Shuey Part I

Chris Shuey, MPH, director of the Southwest Research and Information Center, presents preliminary research findings on the Navajo Birth Cohort Study at the Tribal Environmental Health Summit at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Ariz. The presentation, which took place on June 20, 2016, provides a background on the DiNEH Project, which informs the cohort study.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XVIII: Community Voices

Benny and Jennifer Benally live in Birdsprings, Ariz., just east of Leupp on the Navajo reservation. When Benny was still a young boy, not yet of school age, he lived in a uranium camp just north of Monument Valley, Utah, called VCA Mine No. 2 where his father worked as a uranium mining laborer. Now 72, he tells his story of how living so close to a uranium mine as a young boy changed his life. Told in the Navajo language, this powerful short video explains the Navajo legacy of uranium.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XIX Year 2016

Update on recruitment of cohort study participants, and a brief overview of the study on birth outcomes on the Navajo reservation as it enters its fourth year of the study mandated by the U.S. Congress.

The Navajo Birth Cohort Study is a study about the effects of abandoned uranium mines and its associated heavy metals on the development of Navajo children, their moms and dads. The study was mandated by the U.S. Congress in August 2010 and began recruitment three years later in February 2012. Since then, the study has recruited more than 500 participants on the Navajo reservation.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XVII: The Legacy Continues

Johnnye Lewis, PhD, principal investigator on community engagement of the cohort study, gives a presentation during a training session in Albuquerque. The group engages in the importance of informing the community about the effects of uranium contaminants to environmental health.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XVI: Blue Gap Chapter

Chris Shuey, project director of the Southwest Research and Information Center Project, and his study partners from UNM share preliminary results with the chapter community of Blue Gap/Tachee, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XV: Women's Health Minute

As the first video to present an update of preliminary results that were analyzed and approved by the Center for Disease Control and UNM's Community Environmental Health Programs, it features examples of the short radio pieces shared with local media and radio stations.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XIII Update 1

Navajo matriarch Helen Nez and her daughter Seraphina Nez describe how they lived near an active uranium mine where Helen, as a young mother, cleaned around the uranium mining area. This affected her children, three of whom were born with Navajo neuropathy. They recount the stigma they faced from health officials, their community and their eventual path to environmental justice activism.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study XIV Join Us Now

Principal investigator Johnnye Lewis, PhD, and director of the Community Environmental Health Program at the UNM Health Sciences Center gives insight to the importance of the Navajo Birth Cohort Study. This video provides some basic background on the study and begins with Carol Blackhorse, 97, an elder from Big Mountain, Ariz., telling the story of the birth of Changing Woman. The study takes its lead from Navajo oral histories about teachings that surround womanhood and birthing.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XII Journey Woman

The two-minute segments of Women’s Health Minute are radio public service announcements that the Navajo Birth Cohort Study features on local community radio stations on the Navajo reservation. This short video uses excerpts from the PSAs to produce a short video that provides wellness information to women.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study XI PSA

This short video uses a public service announcement that was produced in partnership with Navajo Broadcast Services in both the Navajo and English languages to promote the Navajo Birth Cohort Study.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part IX The Leadership

Listen to the Health and Human Resources Committee Chair and Navajo Nation Council Delegate Jonathan Hale talk about the importance of the Navajo Birth Cohort Study. This video presents the case for doing a cohort study in the areas of the Navajo reservation directly affected by abandoned uranium mines.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part IV Get Your Water Tested

This video was produced and directed by Community Health Environmental Research Specialist (CHERS) Melissa Samuels about the importance of testing your drinking water.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part VII A Father Speaks

This short video documents the oral history of a father from Pinon, Ariz. The late Nicholas Claushee plays his guitar and talks candidly about how he didn’t pay much attention to health advice when he was young. “I don’t have the luxury to walk around egg shells,” he says about dealing with an illness. In 2014, Nicholas died of leukemia. He was 32.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part XI Public Outreach

Public outreach for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study is one of the most crucial aspects of successfully recruiting participants: moms-to-be, baby, and fathers who will provide survey information. Their homes will receive environmental assessments after they give consent to participate in the study for one year. This short video is a document of our outreach efforts to the greater public.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part VI Outreach

Public outreach for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study is one of the most crucial aspects of successfully recruiting participants: moms-to-be, baby, and fathers who will provide survey information. This video documents outreach efforts for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part V Red Water Pond Road

Every year, the Red Water Pond Road community near Churchrock, N.M., commemorates the 1974 uranium waste spill that flowed into the Rio Puerco, one of the worst environmental catastrophes on the Navajo reservation. This video documents community voices at the 2013 commemoration.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part IV Perspectives

The Monument Valley and southeast Utah community of the Navajo reservation is one of the most affected abandoned uranium mine areas. This video provides some perspectives on families who came together to speak out when they were affected by uranium waste contamination. The community is now a Superfund cleanup site.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part III Legacy of Uranium

Dr. David Begay, co-investigator for the Navajo Cohort Study provides background information in the Navajo language about the importance of the Navajo Birth Cohort Study. This video was produced at the very beginning of recruitment for the study mandated by the U.S. Congress in August 2010.

Navajo Birth Cohort Study Part II Eligibility Screening

Charlotte Swindal, an RN from Chinle Indian Health Services, and her staff provide a mock recruitment interview for a public service announcement. In this mock recruitment interview, a possible Navajo Birth Cohort Study participant is interviewed to see if she qualifies to be a participant. This video documents our recruitment efforts in the first months of the study.

Overview of Navajo Birth Cohort Study

The first public service announcement and promotional video for the Navajo Birth Cohort Study, which provides basic brochure information about the importance of the study.